You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Resume’ tag.

One day I decided to go down a blackout water slide backwards on a tube, thinking it was going to be awesome. The staff gave me a little push and off I went—I’m having a blast! It’s dark and I can’t see anything and my adrenaline is running high. Then out of nowhere a sharp turn comes that lifts me off the tube and smacks the side of my head. Now I’m sliding down tubeless, still backward, not having blast… thinking this was a bad idea. And that’s exactly how life is, filled with unexpected turns called obstacles.

Obstacles, you can’t avoid them. They are just creeping by, waiting for the moment you least expect it. Just when you thought things couldn’t get any better, out of nowhere life says hold up, not so fast and smacks you across the face. Sometimes we create our own obstacles, and other times things just happen out of our control. For instance, you bombed that interview that you spent days practicing for, the train decided to get rerouted today out of all days, you wrote ABC instead of NBC on your cover letter, you called somebody important by the wrong name, you are looking to gain experience in your field but everywhere you go they require experience, someone doesn’t like you simply because you are attractive, and the list goes on. From the most bizarre obstacles to our everyday headaches.

How do we deal with obstacles? We learn from them, we move on, and we don’t let obstacles define us. We plan ahead of time, we double-check things, we ask for help, and most importantly we try again. When we give up is when we truly fail in life, minor set backs are just lessons.

“Fall seven times, stand up eight”—Japanese Proverb

Yerelyn is a native New Yorker, with Dominican roots in her blood. She loves to read, write, and is pursuing acting. She loves lending a helping hand or words of encouragement to those in need of it. She is majoring in Communication and Media here at CUNY SPS.

 

Few things rock a sense of self more than getting laid off.

I should know, I’ve had 4 employers in the past 18 months.  You may immediately think, “What is she doing wrong?”  Sometimes I think that myself.

But I work in the garment industry.  Unfortunately, like publishing, the music industry, and analog media, my industry is shrinking.  And paradigms of these businesses are changing.  There is now a permanent freelance and intern class of workers.  In shrinking industries such as these, creative job searching is key.

Inevitably, after losing a job, there is a period of grieving.  I’ve found the best cure to the bruised ego is to get back into the saddle as soon as possible.  Here are my 6 tips for bouncing back, and landing a new position.

I know the word “branding” is overused, but this is the digital age, so we all must package ourselves like a Godiva ballotin. Here are some personal branding tips:

  1. Polish your resume: There are a ton of websites dedicated to helping you write a great resume. Explore and use them.  Here’s one on my faves:   http://resume-help.org/resume_writing_tips.htm
    • Don’t forget the cover letter: Even with e-mail or online applications, a killer cover letter helps get you noticed.
    • Update your LinkedIn profile: Those resume tips above work great here too.  Consider investing in a professional profile photo.  Repost interesting articles to get your profile noticed, or better yet, write an article showing your writing skills and creativity.
    • Scrub your social media presence: Hide all those pics with the red plastic cups.
  2. Assess your skill setBe humble enough to admit there is always more to learn.  Stay relevant and take classes where needed.  Some excellent free choices are: Coursera, MIT Open CourseWare, and even Lynda, LinkedIn’s online learning arm, which offers 10 day free trails.
  3. Write your elevator pitch: That 30-60 second narrative that tells who you are and why you are perfect for the job.  Practice it in front of a mirror till you have it down.

Lisa Sheridan, Communications and Media

  1. Network:  You never know where a job lead can come, it could be from a friend of a friend.  So tell everyone you know that you are looking for a job.  Do not be ashamed!
  2. Practice mock-interviews Enlist the help of a good friend and role play some interviews.  Become comfortable with talking about your accomplishments.  Gather quantifiable data about why you are the right choice for the job.  “At my previous position, I was able to grow sales by 10% by improving our social media presence.”  Our own Career Services here at SPS can provide valuable insights on this step as well as the entire job hunting process.
  3. Remember to follow up: Don’t forget the thank you notes, the follow-up phone calls, and keep recrafting your resume, cover letter and LinkedIn Profile.

Finding a new job is a full-time job.  But with diligence, creativity, and a spirit of adventure, you will land a new post in no time.

Designer, single mom, and ongoing student, Lisa Sheridan is busy juggling life, work, and academics as an undergraduate in the Communication and Media department.

I came back to school in 2014 because I knew I was smart, talented, and worthy of that piece of paper. I came back because I wanted more opportunities. I wanted the ability to apply for a job knowing I was exactly who that company desired.

Well, I’m in the midst of a job search that’s beating me down a bit, in which I’ve incurred many rejections. For the longest time I didn’t know what I wanted to do for a living. On a certain level, I still don’t. As a Communications and Media major, there are many avenues open. I have a great deal of interest in digital fields. I love films, and TV, so working for a studio, or a network, or a production company appeals to me. There’s also something very alluring about an interactive company, one that’s advancing media, or an idea into the future.

Back to those rejections. I’m sure many of the students at SPS are here for similar reasons. Maybe you’re tired of your current job; it doesn’t pay enough, the hours are bad, you’re stuck in a position with limited upward mobility. Believe me, I feel you.

I’m finding it difficult to get past a certain stage in the interview process. I’ve had several phone interviews, made it through the assignment stage, and in some cases to in-person appointments. They’ve all ended the same:

“We’ve decided to go in a different direction.”

“We’re looking for someone with a little bit more experience.”

*Bachelor’s degree required*

After many months of applying for jobs that I knew I wasn’t qualified for (on paper), I decided to apply for jobs in which my transferable skills would pop. Sometimes that means making what you might consider a lateral move, which I’m accepting of. I’ve worked for the last year with the terrific advisors in the Career Services department on refining my resume, learning what to expect in an interview (questions, answers, how to ask questions), and was taught the importance of networking. In my case, the informational interview has been an important part of my growth not because its gotten me a job, but because down the road, those contacts may be helpful in providing a new opportunity.

****I urge everyone to give Shannon Gallo or Kelsey Richardson in Career Services a call. If you’re like me—someone who’s been at the same company for a long time, and never had a lot of experience in looking for a job before—they have a wealth of great information and advice.****

I plan on coming back to the blog with quick updates about my progress, and to share some experiences during the process. Hopefully one day soon I’ll be able to report positive progress in the way of a new job! Until then, I’ll keep sending out resumes, and writing cover letters. I said earlier, the negativity that comes with applying to jobs has beaten me down a bit, but it hasn’t defeated me. Coming back to school reinvigorated me. It’s a lot for all of us to deal with, especially taking into account the amount of hours we work on top of going to school. I’m more motivated now to succeed than at any point in my life, and I look forward to the challenges to come.

Robert is a current student here at CUNY SPS, pursuing a degree in Communication and Media. He is interested in platforms of media, especially those related to digital media; and a fan of serious film as well as this current golden age of television.