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Few things rock a sense of self more than getting laid off.

I should know, I’ve had 4 employers in the past 18 months.  You may immediately think, “What is she doing wrong?”  Sometimes I think that myself.

But I work in the garment industry.  Unfortunately, like publishing, the music industry, and analog media, my industry is shrinking.  And paradigms of these businesses are changing.  There is now a permanent freelance and intern class of workers.  In shrinking industries such as these, creative job searching is key.

Inevitably, after losing a job, there is a period of grieving.  I’ve found the best cure to the bruised ego is to get back into the saddle as soon as possible.  Here are my 6 tips for bouncing back, and landing a new position.

I know the word “branding” is overused, but this is the digital age, so we all must package ourselves like a Godiva ballotin. Here are some personal branding tips:

  1. Polish your resume: There are a ton of websites dedicated to helping you write a great resume. Explore and use them.  Here’s one on my faves:   http://resume-help.org/resume_writing_tips.htm
    • Don’t forget the cover letter: Even with e-mail or online applications, a killer cover letter helps get you noticed.
    • Update your LinkedIn profile: Those resume tips above work great here too.  Consider investing in a professional profile photo.  Repost interesting articles to get your profile noticed, or better yet, write an article showing your writing skills and creativity.
    • Scrub your social media presence: Hide all those pics with the red plastic cups.
  2. Assess your skill setBe humble enough to admit there is always more to learn.  Stay relevant and take classes where needed.  Some excellent free choices are: Coursera, MIT Open CourseWare, and even Lynda, LinkedIn’s online learning arm, which offers 10 day free trails.
  3. Write your elevator pitch: That 30-60 second narrative that tells who you are and why you are perfect for the job.  Practice it in front of a mirror till you have it down.

Lisa Sheridan, Communications and Media

  1. Network:  You never know where a job lead can come, it could be from a friend of a friend.  So tell everyone you know that you are looking for a job.  Do not be ashamed!
  2. Practice mock-interviews Enlist the help of a good friend and role play some interviews.  Become comfortable with talking about your accomplishments.  Gather quantifiable data about why you are the right choice for the job.  “At my previous position, I was able to grow sales by 10% by improving our social media presence.”  Our own Career Services here at SPS can provide valuable insights on this step as well as the entire job hunting process.
  3. Remember to follow up: Don’t forget the thank you notes, the follow-up phone calls, and keep recrafting your resume, cover letter and LinkedIn Profile.

Finding a new job is a full-time job.  But with diligence, creativity, and a spirit of adventure, you will land a new post in no time.

Designer, single mom, and ongoing student, Lisa Sheridan is busy juggling life, work, and academics as an undergraduate in the Communication and Media department.

I recently attended an SPS Career Services workshop and networking seminar lead by career expert Arlene Newman. Newman is the President of Career Bound Success and has an extensive background in Human Resources across multiple industries. Newman emphasized the importance of networking in career endeavors and divulged techniques that are useful for successful networking. I will highlight the key points of the seminar and share with you some of the points I think are effective.

Before embarking on your networking journey, it is necessary to devise a clear plan by outlining your objectives, profiling your unique personality, and highlighting your strengths. It is fundamental to ask yourself these questions so you can offer a thorough presentation and give others a clear vision of who you are and what you have to offer. This is also known as an “elevator pitch”– a 30 second to 2 minute clear, concise and carefully planned description that summarizes your personal brand.

From here on, your focus should be on building rapport through the following networks:
• Friends & Family
• Work and Professional Organizations
• Classmates, Alumni Groups and Professors
• Community, Political and Religious Organizations

It is very important to have a positive and enthusiastic attitude in your communication with others. No matter what mood you are in or if you left your last job on a negative circumstance, ensure that your comments are positive. You also must be prepared–this means having a business card ready for all networking events. Your card can display “student” and your major, and if possible, list skills on the back of the card, or even an inspirational quote that is a reflection of your principles. Follow up with every individual through e-mail or a phone call. If there is no answer, always leave a voicemail.

Keep in mind that technology is not 100% reliable, so if you do not get a response the first time, it is okay to send a second e-mail.

Research your field, as well as individuals and organizations pertaining to it. This will prepare you to participate in conversations and become aware of trends and events.

Networking has become an extremely broad concept through our technological evolution, as we now have the tools to increase our networking capabilities. Companies, graduate schools and organizations, are fully aware of this and using online search tools to investigate candidates. Newman stressed the importance of maintaining a professional online presence. To prevent the possibility of a negative image, Google yourself regularly and interact in social networks with your professional image in mind.

Key words for networking:
Authenticity
– Be proud of who you are, your background, your skills and your traits. Use this to your advantage- it makes you unique!
Consistency
– Your ideologies should remain the same anywhere you are visible
Credibility-
Build trust by being honest and upholding integrity with each person that you meet.
Unique
– In a competitive job market, it is vital to display what makes you different, in order to distinguish yourself from the rest.
Visibility
– In order to network, you must be noticeable to the world – achieved through attending events and sustaining a public online presence.

Following these networking guidelines are a start to building long lasting relationships with individuals that can assist you in building your education and career. With every person you meet, you should treat the interaction as a potential opportunity. You should also incorporate philanthropy in networking by approaching it as a two way street- expect to receive as much as you give out.

Don’t worry if you missed this workshop, you have an opportunity to attend Ask The Expert this Wednesday 11/9 at 6pm.  This SPS Career Services program and networking event features a panel of Human Resources professionals answering all your questions about job search and careers.  There’s still time to sign up!

Nivia Martinez is a senior undergraduate student at the CUNY School of Professional Studies, majoring in Communications and Culture.  Upon graduating, she plans to continue her education by pursuing her Masters in international studies and sociocultural anthropology.  In her spare time she enjoys attending cultural events and attending sport events with her 11 year old son, Esteban.